Why we crumble as we age and how modern medicine makes it worse

Reading Time: 3 minutes
crumbs
People And Bread Crumbs Have A Lot In Common

In my most recent article, I discussed the pitfalls of modern drugs and how they play havoc with our bodies. In this article, I will alert you to a few more examples of drug treatment interfering with our natural physiological healing processes.

Alarmingly, this is now the common approach to most of our long-term illnesses.

Crumbling People

Most of these chronic illnesses could be simply classified as aging— that is, major organs and systems “crumble” with age. Indeed, elderly patients admitted to ER in hospitals are referred to as “crumblers”. They often have multiple organ failures and the hospital systems are hopelessly inadequate to cope with them.

It is estimated that there are 1500 deaths of “crumblers” per year due to excessive waiting times. The waiting occurs because specialists refuse to treat these inconvenient crumbling people, who actually need a GP trained in holistic medicine, who can examine, diagnose  and treat their multiple disorders. This is recognised in the UK where there are many GPs employed in hospitals, but ignored in Australia.

We all age, deteriorate and turn into crumblers, but our system of ultra-specialisation (each specialist treating just one organ or system) is badly flawed.

Drug Treatment Anomalies

I first became aware of the anomalies of drug treatment when learning about the glycosides extracted from foxglove plants. This was called digitalis from which digoxin and digitoxin were isolated. Digoxin became the drug of choice for chronic heart failure (usually in the elderly) and I remember being perplexed when told the over-all survival rate hardly changed. As the digoxin increased the heart output, the heart muscle itself swelled, became less efficient and sometimes induced heart-valve and pace-maker problems.

It didn’t seem to matter as digoxin is still used today and the inconvenient truths about it ignored.

Attempts To Mimic Neuro-Transmitters

Another early development was based on the neuro-transmitters Acetylcholine and Cholinesterase. These flit in and out of existence in micro-seconds all over the body, allowing nerve impulses to pass into muscle receptors. They are thus integral to the successful function of all organisms and there were many attempts to develop drugs that mimicked or promoted their action. Nearly all of them failed because of the ephemeral and wide-spread nature of these neuro-transmitters, but a few are still being used (in desperation) to treat otherwise intractable problems like irritable bowel syndrome and gastric disorders.

The Bad News

The bad news is that the anti-cholinesterases took off in a big way with the development of hundreds of organo-phosphate pesticides and herbicides. Many of these were simply nasty and dangerous and were eventually banned, but some still persist. They do their killing by prolonging the action of acetylcholine, which then acts as a poison by paralysing natural communication systems.

The quantities drenching our farmlands, water tables and food chains (now including the ubiquitous Glyphosate or “Round-Up”) are frightening and could explain many modern childhood neurological disorders.

Clouds Of Glyphosate

I shudder as I see pregnant women blithely walking through clouds of glyphosate being happily sprayed everywhere by jolly council workers, and home gardeners who believe the propaganda spruiked by the manufacturers. It is another madness to keep pouring this stuff into our already badly degraded environment, with the developing neurology of the un-born and the very young at intense risk.

An irony of all this is that the latest (desperate) attempts to treat Alzheimer’s disease are expensive anti-cholinesterases, which may very well have contributed to the problem in the first place.

Related Posts:
Sighed Effects – What Drugs Can Really Do To You

Robert Gosstray

Robert Gosstray is a retired pharmacist and the resident health writer for Midlifexpress. He is the author of The Pharmacist's Secrets: Drugs, lies and money.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!